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The Internet of things and other 2015 trends you need to know about

key15As a special holiday treat, eMarketer is sharing a complimentary report entitled Key Digital Trends for 2015.
The report is broken up into three distinct sections. First, it describes the the five key trends in consumer behavior and technology adoption that every marketer needs to know about. Next, it delves into five buzzy technologies that could possibly gain traction in 2015, but are still unproven. Finally, it plainly calls out the areas that “are more hot air than hard reality.”
Here’s a brief outline of the findings:

Five key things you need to know about 2015

  1. ‘Responsiveness’ will rule
  2. Mobile search will surpass desktop
  3. Programmatic will move beyond digital display
  4. The Internet of things will become a thing
  5. Cross-device targeting at scale

Five things that might get big (but might not)

  1. Wearables: not quite ready to wear
  2. Mobile payments? Wait until next year
  3. New life for social commerce
  4. Will content marketing sputter?
  5. Cord-cutting: still more hype than reality

Five things you won’t need to worry about

  1. The desktop
  2. QR codes: not the next big thing
  3. Social TV: the conversation is pretty quiet
  4. Baby boomers: going bust
  5. Privacy? Security? Yawn.

Learn more by downloading the full report and exploring additional resources below.
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Social Technologies Unlocked: Hearsay Social CEO speaks at Churchill Club


Would you believe that social media and social networks are mostly untapped across both the enterprise and consumer landscapes?
That’s the finding of a McKinsey Global Institute report entitled The Social Economy: Unleashing Value and Productivity Through Social Technologies. In advance of the report’s publication, several of the best minds in social media met in San Francisco for a panel discussion hosted by the Churchill Club, which has organized events for a quarter of a century with big names like Bill Gates, Bill Clinton, and Arianna Huffington.
For the social technologies-focused session, Hearsay Social CEO Clara Shih sat on the panel amongst esteemed leaders in the social media space, including Wendy Arnott, VP of Social Media, TD Bank Group; BJ Fogg, Founder and Director, the Persuasive Technology Lab at Stanford University; David Gutelius, Chief Scientist, Jive Software. The panel was moderated by Michael Chui, a Senior Fellow at the McKinsey Global Institute.
View the discussion in its entirety in the video below and check out some of the best live tweets from the event:

What are you waiting for? Smart retailers already foster real relationships and make real money by going social-local

The Financial Times recently posted a story with the headline Retailers wait for Facebook to deliver. In the article, the authors (Barney Jopson, David Gelles, and April Dembosky) discuss the discouraging results seen by retail efforts on Facebook:

Even as US Christmas shoppers have spent record sums online this year, one of the biggest disappointments for some internet entrepreneurs has been a company that is otherwise hot property: Facebook.
Retail executives and consultants say Facebook has yet to take off as a retail platform, defying excited predictions that “social commerce” – jargon for shopping via social media sites – would be the next big thing.

While the article makes many good points about how social commerce, or “F-commerce” (“F” for “Facebook”), hasn’t yet lived up to the hype, there’s a concept missing: the value of social-local retailers.

Co-founders Clara Shih and Steve Garrity created Hearsay Social two years ago on the foundation that social media will best work for businesses at the local level. Retail marketers should use their global Facebook or Twitter page to build brand awareness and make themselves more personable to fans, but they won’t have a truly social business until their businesses engage social at the local store level.
It was Clara and Steve’s original vision when Hearsay Social launched and, today, more and more marketers are opening their eyes to the possibility of local. Just look at this selection from marketing experts ClickZ’s six predictions for social marketing in 2012:

4. There will be less content with a national focus and more localization. Studying data from clients that are corporate franchises with hundreds or thousands of local stores, we found that their social media efforts gained the most user interaction when they had a local focus.
Localized content – be it a geo-targeted Facebook ad, a region-specific contest, or even just a tweet highlighting a local news story – creates seven to 10 times higher levels of engagement than non-locally relevant content. We expect to see more brands target and personalize their social marketing content at the country, region, city, and designated market area (DMA) level to optimize user participation.

Many large companies have already realized the importance of maintaining a global corporate page on Facebook, Twitter, and other popular networks.
Once those companies start going local on social media, however, it will be like shaking hands with actual customers, not just splashing catchy billboards along the freeway. From a retailer’s perspective, going local means creating individual social profiles and pages on all the most prominent networks (from Facebook to Google+) for individual franchises in small towns and cities across the nation.
As corporate pages focus on bolstering brand, these local franchise pages can work toward doing real business, like driving in-store traffic with coupons and other rewards programs. The local pages will see higher engagement, as they can provide content hyper-targeted to customers in their region. And, as this is the basis of all good business, local page owners can actually foster real relationships with real people.
Real people spend real money, and that’s where you’ll see the biggest impact of ROI on social business.