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How to make your Facebook Business Page more engaging

Every day, more and more organizations across several different industries are encouraging and even requiring their employees to engage with customers via social media. For non-marketers, starting a Facebook Business Page and connecting with your customers on social media can at first seem daunting.
As part of the Hearsay Social Customer Success team, I work full-time on coaching corporate teams to help their employees achieve higher conversions and brand loyalty through social media. When new users start going social, they often ask, “How do I get more ‘likes’ to my Facebook Business Page?” While likes are great for increasing your reach and the number of people able to see your content, the real million dollar question you want to ask is, “How do I get more engagement on my Facebook Business Page?” Likes are not as powerful if those fans are not liking, posting comments, and sharing your content with others.
Here are my top five suggestions for making your Facebook Business Page more engaging:

1. The social media rule of thirds

If your foot doctor had a Facebook business page (and they probably do), would you want him/her to publish Facebook posts about foot fungus and cracked heels every day? Probably not. It’s not fun to hear and it’s not relevant to your everyday interests. This is a pretty extreme example, but we can apply this same logic to insurance agents, real estate agents, car dealers and more. When deciding on what to post to Facebook day in and day out, keep your business talk in check by following the social media rule of thirds:

  • One third of the time, post about your business or brand. This includes your own blog posts and press releases, announcements about your upcoming events and speaking engagements, and other similarly self-promotional content.
  • One third of the time, post about topics or info directly related to your business, but using material from a third-party source. This includes news items from your favorite publications, graphs of analyst data visualizations, and other outside materials.
  • One third of the time, just show off your personality. This includes posting photos of the team hard at work (or at play!), friendly well wishes over holidays, and anything else that reminds your fans that behind the logo are real people.

2. Photos Please!

In case you aren’t familiar with EdgeRank, it’s Facebook’s algorithm that determines who sees what. Basically it determines what social media content, like posts, photos, and videos, you will see in your Facebook News Feed.
There are three criteria that make up EdgeRank: affinity, weight and recency. The part that most significantly impacts content engagement is the weight which corresponds to the type of post selected by the user. Some content types are considered more important than others and will have a higher probability of showing up in your fans’ News Feeds.
Here is the order of weight in EdgeRank:

a. Photos
b. Videos
c. Web Links
d. Messages (just text)

Make sure many of your posts have a picture or a video to secure a higher probably of having the post land in your fans’ Facebook News Feeds. The more frequently your photos appear there, the higher the chance that they will comment on it. In addition, photos are the most engaging type of content, which is why it is weighted higher in Facebook’s algorithm.

3. Short and Sweet

One of the many factors that has made Twitter successful is their 140 character limit. It forces people to be succinct. Even when posting on Facebook, where there is virtually no character limit, you should still write brief messages to be the most effective. Your fans want to quickly scan their News Feed to see what’s happening in the lives of their fans and friends. Make it easy on your fans by keeping your messages to less than 2-3 sentences (and remember that photo!). If they can read and understand your point quickly, they will have be more motivated to like and comment on your post.

4. Ask Questions

If you want engagement, why not ask them to engage? The easiest way to do that is to ask a simple question. When people know the answer or have an opinion, they feel the need to share. Example questions:

  • I’m planning my next vacation. What do you recommend?
  • I can’t believe it’s my parent’s 50th wedding anniversary! What’s the best restaurant for a group dinner?
  • What’s your life motto?

5. Schedule Posts for the Weekend

Believe it or not, Americans are not always outside playing in the yard on the weekends (and if they are, they have their mobile devices with them). Even on weekends and holidays, lots of people are checking their Facebook feeds and engaging with content there. In fact, businesses get 32% more consumer engagement on the weekends than on weekdays, according to Socialfresh. By the way, vacation isn’t an excuse for not posting on the weekends. Just login to Hearsay Social and schedule your posts in advance.
Hopefully you found these tips useful and can apply them next time you post from Facebook or Hearsay Social!

Anatomy of the New Facebook Pages Brand Timeline

Note: All Facebook Pages will automatically transition to the brand timeline format at the end of the month. The following is a chapter from our how-to guide for the Facebook Page Brand Timeline Redesign, a free resource featuring everything you need to know about the new social marketing tools.

The number one thing to know with the new Facebook Pages is that this is the page users will see when they visit your brand on Facebook. No more fan-gating and no more auto-redirecting users to custom-created tabs. This is it. So it’s important to understand each individual component and the part each plays in the whole picture.

  1. The cover photo is easily the most visually striking element of Facebook’s new brand pages, and you can bet that it’s the first thing any user will notice when they visit your page. Images uploaded as covers must be a minimum of 720 pixels wide.
  2. Layered above the cover photo, the profile picture is the second most important visual element of the timeline. Many brands will find this to be the perfect place for their logo, especially since this is the image which users will see alongside your posts in the News Feed. Your page name will appear in plain text to the right of this photo.
  3. Directly underneath the profile photo is the about section, where you can share basic information about your business, like founding year, contact information, location, and any other general info.
  4. To the right of the about section are the app buttons, which replace tabs from the old Facebook Pages. Only four of these buttons are displayed automatically, and the first of these is reserved for Photos. The other three, and any others made visible by clicking a small arrow on the right, can be customized by the business page administrator.
  5. The Facepile displays all the people who have liked your brand’s page. If a visiting user has friends who have already liked the page, then those users will be displayed in the Facepile first.
  6. Timeline
    a. Post: The blank box on the top left side of the timeline is an ordinary input box for you or your fans to post a status update, a photo, or any other content to share on the timeline.
    b. Just like on the Facebook Wall of old, the actual timeline displays the newest posts at the top and older posts as you scroll down. One nifty innovation of the timeline is that it displays fewer posts the further back in time you go, so that it’s easy to learn about a business’s whole history in one quick overview. Add compelling content from your early years for those users savvy enough to explore your past!
    c. Pinning holds a status update, photo, or other piece of content of your choosing to the top of the timeline for exactly seven days.
    d. Highlighting extends the width of posts across the timeline, making them more clearly visible as users scroll down the page.

Now that you’ve read this chapter, read the full how-to guide for the Facebook Page Brand Timeline Redesign. Learn about the new rules for cover photos, how you should transition from the wall to the timeline, and other digestible tips for creating the best possible business page on Facebook.