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Career Tips for Difficult Times: Founders’ Perspectives

The Wall Street Journal held a virtual Jobs Summit recently where Clara Shih, Founder & Executive Chairwoman of Hearsay was interviewed alongside Kenneth Lin, Founder & CEO of CreditKarma. Michelle Ma, WSJ Assistant Editor, Live Journalism, dug into what they learned from the 2008 recession, which was the time period both Shih and Lin founded companies.

Over ten years later, here we are again. As CEOs who have weathered difficult times and hired their fair share of candidates over the years, they had some excellent advice for those who find themselves unemployed, like so many Americans today.

If you missed the live event, here are the highlights.

Every job teaches a skill

Lin suggested that every job can build your skillset. He shared that he once had a job as a dialer for stockbrokers. This involved a stack of index cards with names and phone numbers on them and dialing all day with the goal of getting those people on the phone. Though it may have seemed like a trivial role, he learned how to be more confident on the phone; a valuable skill.

The lesson? Even a job you may not be excited about is teaching you something. If you end up taking a position that’s not perfect to put food on the table, look for what you can learn and make the most of the job you have. Then when you interview for your next role, present what you learned.

Hustle and other top skills in demand, today and beyond

Everyone knows times are tough and what was relatively easy 6 months ago takes real work in today’s virtual, budget-conscious world. That’s why when Clara’s hiring these days she’s looking for someone with hustle, which she defines as someone who knows how to get creative, get things done, and take risks. Number two for Shih is empathy/EQ and knowing how to connect with people in a remote setting.

Lin shared that passion is one of his key criteria. When times are tough, what pulls people through is when they love what they do. He said he knows sometimes it’ll just be a paycheck, but if you have a choice, pick the job you love.

In terms of skills based on experience (hard skills), Shih suggested that the ability to connect with customers, writing code/engineering, and being able to write (content, copywriting, etc.) are always in demand.

Mine LinkedIn for Hidden Career Advice

Have you been using LinkedIn to re-establish dormant connections and see how the people you admire got where they are? If not, it’s time to get your LinkedIn hustle on.

When Ma mentioned that Clara has said LinkedIn is a blessing for job-seekers, Clara enthusiastically talked about the ability to look at the career paths of people you admire and see how they’ve gotten to where you want to be—what did they study, what certifications do they have, what kind of experience do they have? Take this opportunity to map the next steps you want to take in your career. Then invest in yourself and get the skills you need to take the next steps.

Valuable advice from a mentor

Randy Komisar, a prominent Silicon Valley attorney, executive, and author was a professor of Shih’s at Stanford. Like many college seniors, she wasn’t sure what she wanted to do once she graduated. When she asked him how to think about her career, he told her that if she wanted a big career in tech, she needed to build up generally valuable skill sets, including these three things:

Ship a new product end-to-end: conception, design, prototype, iteration, shipping, launch, continuous lifecycle
Customer experience skills (sales, account management, etc.)
Learn how to manage people

Resume vs. referral: what’s more powerful?

Someone in the audience asked how many people are hired based solely on a resume versus a referral. Shih and Lin agreed here; referrals are preferable. Shih pointed out that this speaks to the importance of networks (another point in favor of re-connecting if it’s been a while!), while Lin mentioned that referrals have higher close rates. Shih also noted, however, that a referral only gets someone in the door; they still have to earn the job. Both do extensive reference checks and interviewees speak with multiple people within the company before being offered a position.

Keep going!

This has been a hard year and there are lots of smart people out there looking for their next role. Aside from the excellent advice they shared for job seekers, Shih and Lin also shared the truth behind start-up life, which can serve as excellent inspiration to keep going through the tough times. A start up founder and CEO, during a recession or not, gets knocked down over and over again. CreditKarma almost ran out of money three times; Shih cleaned the office along with her CEO/product manager/designer/you name it duties. For 99% of start-ups, it can take years of grit and determination before making it. The big secret? Just keep going!

We currently have a number of open positions at Hearsay, so take a look at the Careers page and let us know if there’s a match.

The Key is Context – Unlocking the Modernization of Archiving & Supervision

Why mess with a good thing? Sometimes we hit on something that works so well that it never changes – like Coca Cola. Unfortunately, most things are not Coke and need to evolve. Email-based archiving – particularly when applied to client engagement activities across social and texting – is one of those areas begging to be modernized.

To meet regulatory recordkeeping requirements and standards (i.e., SEC, FINRA, CFTC, FCA and others), firms have long relied on an email-based approach to take delivery of client communications into their archives. Email-based archiving (SFTP) is akin to sending a package – data is stripped down and organized to fit nicely in a box that can be sorted in a similar way with all the other packages. While the approach results in compliance with archiving mandates, it hampers compliance teams, rendering them less effective and efficient. What this approach lacks is context. Activities are delivered into the archive sometimes as they occur – most commonly with a delay – and are siloed by channel, forcing supervision to piece together conversations that are taking place across days, networks, and channels. This approach conjures up images of old police TV mysteries with cork boards and pinned pieces of yarn to connect suspects – it doesn’t reflect the technological progress we’ve made in other areas of financial services.

However, that is beginning to change. As more efficient, modern methods of data transfer have been introduced, some firms are re-examining how this data is being transferred to them. Archiving via API provides full context of digital communications and real time access. They have a thread based on a full view of the interactions between two contacts instead of the legacy structure imposed by an email-based configuration.

With API-led approaches, firms are gaining real-time access to communications in order to bring speed and efficiency to the archiving and review process.  We’ve made investments in Hearsay’s Compliance API to offer real-time access to a stream of activities that unlocks integrations with API-led platforms simplifying and modernizing recordkeeping, supervision, and discovery. Critically this offers Supervision teams a unified view of activities across channels to see a full, clear picture, so that the right activities are flagged and remediated.

All this to say that now is the time for firms to consider evaluating whether their archiving processes are as effective as they could be. An API archiving process doesn’t require a massive transformation of the existing setup – for example Hearsay’s open APIs allow our platform to integrate seamlessly with existing infrastructure bringing more value to your existing compliance foundation. And as you evaluate options, our team stands ready to lend our expertise.

Sometimes, change is a good thing.

Client Connection in a Socially Distanced World

In order to help advisors thrive in the current environment, corporate teams need to rethink how they guide the field through and beyond the present crisis to adapt to new realities and seize the very real opportunities to make their practices stronger than before.

My First Day as CEO of Hearsay Systems

Clara and me last week, appropriately socially distanced [Photo by Radu Ranga]

Today is an exciting and very humbling day for me. After five months as Hearsay’s COO (all virtual) and working closely with Clara Shih, co-founder and CEO of Hearsay Systems, and the Hearsay Board of Directors, I am honored to take the reins from Clara as the new Hearsay CEO and continue to partner with Clara as Hearsay’s Executive Chairperson.

Clara and Steve Garrity founded Hearsay 11 years ago on a belief that the sales and relationship management profession would get upended by the social graph being created on Facebook– fundamentally disrupting the way customers buy, whom they trust, and how they’d want to stay in touch. Over this decade-long journey Clara and the Hearsay team built out a new social selling category, expanded into other key digital channels and developed a platform strategy to better align with customer engagement outcomes. Hearsay also focused on wealth management and insurance sectors and the challenges of providing last mile digital communications in a scalable, compliant manner. Over 170,000 advisors and the most prestigious financial services companies have embraced this vision.

Many Hearsay team members (Chris Andrew, Chief Product Officer and employee #1; Pete Godbole CFO; Robert MacCloy, CTO) and Board Members (Frank Defesche, Jon Sakoda, Bryan Schreier) have been instrumental in this journey and taking the long view toward building the company. I have appreciated their support and counsel over my brief tenure and the support and patience I have received from the entire Hearsay team helping me onboard in a virtual world.

To our team members, customers, and partners, as we start this new phase of our journey together, I wanted to share some of my story with you, why I came here, and what I’m excited to do.

My story

I grew up in Seattle, WA and have been married for 26 years and we have two grown kids. I started as an engineer right out of the University of Washington working at a Bay Area Refinery. I made my way into software and have been blessed to work with many great technology companies (Oracle, SAP, PeopleSoft, Taleo), leaders and colleagues across many functions, projects and transformation efforts. My new, favorite capability/strength is the learnings I have gained from the wins and defeats associated with trying to scale a business, incubating new ideas or drive wholesale change initiatives. I hope to fully exploit this capability in my new role.

There are two simple axioms of leadership I try to espouse. First, everyone is a leader. Some of the most impactful people at any company have no direct reports. They muster followership by their energy, enthusiasm, smarts (EQ and IQ), and organizational and persuasion skills. We need to create environments where anyone can lead.

Second, in 25 years, I’ve learned that accountability and direct dialogue permeate winning teams. If I could wish for two things in any organization it would be a strong culture of accountability/”owning it” and frank, open dialogue on the hard, uncomfortable topics-it’s the only way to get fully aligned, build trust, and let the best ideas win. Clara and the Hearsay leadership team share this perspective.

What drew me to Hearsay

There were three fundamental drivers that made joining Hearsay an easy choice.

1. Significant market opportunity: It starts with an unparalleled customer list. In 25 years working in enterprise software, rarely have I seen this quality and quantity of marquee customer relationships, customers who view us as true partners and trusted advisors to help guide them in their digital transformation journey. Hearsay is also a rare product that is both a vitamin and painkiller, as Clara talks about in her Masters of Scale podcast with Reid Hoffman. Many customers start with our compliance platform (painkiller), but then it builds from there into wholesale transformation to deliver a modern customer experience (vitamin). Most importantly, the last decade of digital transformation was about automation and self-service. Validated by the pandemic, the next decade is about authentic engagement at scale– a category Hearsay has established and will fuel its next chapter of growth.

2. Shared values: Hearsay’s values have remained essentially the same since the company was founded–Customer Focus, Kaizen, and Get-the-Right-Stuff-Done (GRSD). For me, Customer Focus is about the big stuff and the small stuff. You need to get the small stuff right in order to earn the right to do the big stuff (be a trusted advisor). I’ve had many roles throughout my career, from leading M&A at Taleo to CEO of Certent. Each has been an opportunity for me to flex a growth mindset and continuously learn, improve, and grow or put into practice a personal Kaizen approach. Kaizen at a company level and Kaizen at an individual level is the killer combination. Prior to Hearsay, my wife and I took a significant risk in launching a new startup. I learned very quickly no environment demands GRSD more than an early stage company. Everyday you need to be ruthless in how you spend your time and dollars. We had to make some very difficult decisions when we were running low on funds and were fortunate to find a strategic buyer to execute our vision. GRSD has new meaning and purpose given this experience.

3. Opportunity to have an impact: As I got to know Hearsay and got to understand the challenges and opportunities it faces, I realized it is a great match for my diverse set of experiences. More importantly, It’s been inspiring to watch how our customers have depended on Hearsay to reassure and guide their customers during the pandemic – which in turn has given our team a new level of purpose and hustle.

What we will do going forward

The pandemic has only accelerated our next phase of growth, as Hearsay’s engagement platform is now mission-critical for relationship sellers who can no longer meet clients face-to-face. From Social and Sites to Relate and Actions, Hearsay platform utilization, new deals, and customer expansions are accelerating. Our business is outperforming expectations on nearly every metric.

As we embrace this momentum, there are several concrete actions I will be working with our team to drive 2021 performance and make our vision a reality. First and foremost, we need to fill all key existing and new roles across the organization. We need the right talent in place to execute on our ambition sales and product plans. Second, we need to drive a focused set of initiatives to help deliver customer outcomes. The migration to our new, modern reporting solution is a great example. Third, in the next several quarters we will be launching new integrations that help our customers unlock the value in their CRM, marketing automation, and core systems investments.

In everything we do, we need to continue to lead and collaborate with humility and purpose.

Mike

Passing the Torch to Hearsay’s New CEO

A heartfelt thank you and exciting news for Hearsay’s growth, as I transition to the role of Executive Chairperson! Read on to learn more about Hearsay’s new CEO, Mike Boese.

11 years ago today, Steve Garrity and I founded Hearsay Labs on a belief that the sales profession would get upended by the social graph being created on Facebook– fundamentally disrupting the way customers buy, whom they trust, and how they’d want to stay in touch. We came up with the idea for social selling (along with a few other ideas which didn’t make the cut), hired some friends and their friends, played a lot of ping pong, and wrote code day and night.

Every day was exciting, nerve-racking, unexpected. I’ll never forget the day in early 2011 we stumbled on the need for reg tech. We were in Boston visiting a prospective Fortune 500 customer. Our prospect cut to the chase – she wanted to know whether Hearsay could increase her laptop storage capacity. She turned her computer toward us, and we could see that her desktop was littered with thousands of image files. It turned out that she and her team spent their days manually screenshotting every one of their firm’s thousands of financial advisors’ LinkedIn profiles every hour in order to comply with FINRA advertising rules. Their laptops were literally running out of space. We left stunned and inspired. Once back in California, we went to LinkedIn HQ and pitched them on the need for a compliance API in order to give access to the millions of users in regulated industries who were being blocked. The rest, as they say, is history. We have never stopped building, innovating, and getting inspiration from customers since.

It’s been a thrilling, challenging decade. We’ve helped 170,000 relationship sellers reinvent themselves in the digital era and enabled compliance teams to scale their workload amidst an explosion of digital communications. We’ve raised $50 million and expanded to 22 countries while remaining incredibly capital-efficient due to our industry focus. We created social selling as a category, focused to become an industry cloud, acquired a mobile communications platform, then expanded our charter to last-mile omnichannel engagement to allow our customers to drive outcomes across their full client journey, not just social.

Along the way, I’ve learned countless business, leadership, and life lessons, forged lifelong friendships, and pushed harder, dreamed bigger, and overcome more than I ever thought possible. This last decade has been the journey of a lifetime, and we are just getting started. The first wave of digital transformation in financial services was automation and self-service. Validated by the pandemic, this next wave is about authentic engagement at scale– a category Hearsay has established and will fuel its next chapter of huge growth. As co-founder and CEO, I’ve always done what it takes to make Hearsay successful. Today I’ve decided what Hearsay needs to be successful for the next decade is a new CEO.

Mike and me last week, appropriately socially distanced [photo by Radu Ranga]

Last year, after a decade as CEO, the board and I began looking for the right person to lead Hearsay into its next chapter. With our last-mile engagement category established, platform built, and customers aligning their enterprise transformations, Hearsay had entered a new stage in its evolution which required a new skillset– someone with experience threading and scaling cross-functional processes needed to align our growing number of teams and offices around the world. Our COO  Mike Boese exemplifies these skillsets as well as our company values, and it’s with so much pride and optimism that  I announce he will be our CEO for Hearsay’s next chapter, which I already know will be our biggest yet. I will step into an executive chairwoman role where I can support from the wings.

Let me tell you about him. With his prior experience leading multiple software companies, combined with his humility and “Day 1” hustle, I knew when I met Mike that he was special. Mike studied engineering at the University of Washington and has helped build some of the most important and iconic software companies of our time– Oracle, PeopleSoft, SAP, Taleo. Mike is a former startup founder himself, and has also scaled companies and teams exactly to the next phase of where Hearsay needs to go. Above all, Mike is an incredibly good person, partner, and servant leader deeply committed to our people and customers.

From platform utilization to new deals and customer expansions, our business is outperforming expectations on nearly every metric. Watching how our customers have depended on Hearsay to reassure and guide their customers during the pandemic has given our team a new level of purpose. Thanks to our business performance and Mike’s leadership performance, I know in my heart that the time has come to pass the torch. Our future has never been brighter, and I know the company will flourish under Mike’s stewardship.

What’s next for me? Hearsay will always be my company. As executive chairwoman by day, I’ll be helping Mike advise our customers, codify our team culture, continue building out our leadership team. I’ll stay on full-time for as long as Mike wants, then transition to part-time. That’s the plan for now. Over the next several months, I’ll take some time off to recover from the millions of miles I’ve traveled in the last decade, spend quality time with family, and then figure out what’s next.

Thank you from the bottom of my heart to those who have joined and supported me in this startup journey. My initial list was too long to fit in this post, so apologies in advance for this condensed version:

  • To my husband Dan, thank you for supporting me and making sure I remember to eat and sleep. I love being home with you every day and never want to go back to flying 300,000 miles a year.
  • To my son Blake, it has been such a joy to get to know you deeply, read bedtime stories and tuck you in every night. I’m nervous and excited to be Room Parent for your kindergarten class!
  • To our current and former team, customers, investors, partners, supporters, believers, thank you for the opportunity to build together. You should feel proud that the company is bigger and will last longer than any individual person. I’ll cherish my 11 years as CEO working alongside you and will always carry this experience with me in my heart.
  • To my co-founder Steve, chief bottle-washer Pete, grumpy cat Robert, EQ coach Barkis, deal magician Tom, and contrarian Chris Hearsay with the yellow backpack, thanks for energizing me with your fiercely original ideas, continuously challenging my thinking and assumptions, and for your incredible GSD, support, and friendship over many years. I couldn’t have asked for a better band of misfits to be a part of and grow up with in my career.
  • To Bryan, Jon, Patrick, and Frank, thanks for your support through thick and thin, and for pushing me to act boldly and think bigger. In 11 years, never was there a wasted board conversation or meeting. You’ve always come prepared, been on point, and known exactly which parts of the business to push on.

It has been the privilege of a lifetime to serve as Hearsay’s CEO. As scary as this decision feels, I know in my heart I’m doing what’s best for our future. When the stars align, the choice is clear. I love this company, our team, and our customers, and am so excited for the decade ahead!

Beyond COVID – Transforming Client Engagement and Social Selling

Crises like COVID-19 accelerate the need for human touch at digital scale. While the crisis is temporary, the changes to behaviour and digital acceleration we’re experiencing as a result – more remote work, an expansion of digital communications, upgrades in digital processes and tools – are not.

Five Essential Traits of Successful Digital Leaders in Financial Services

One of the most important success factors in any digital effort is strong leadership. Here are the traits we’ve seen prevail, over and over again.

The financial services industry has changed significantly over the past decade or so. As firms continue to drive digital transformation, Hearsay has had a front row seat collaborating with innovative executives on their digital transformation roadmaps, and we firmly believe that one of the most important success factors in any digital effort is strong leadership. Amongst firms that have thrived, we have consistently seen five traits across successful digital transformation leaders.

1. Agility

If there’s one thing digital leaders understand, it’s that today’s world calls for an agile approach. Technology, competition, and client sentiment change too fast to get bogged down in meetings and/or approval processes that take weeks or months. Add to that a paradigm-shifting global pandemic, and agility solidifies its place – by miles – as the number one most valuable trait in a leader.

Take Prudential Financial for example. The corporate marketing team had been working on a new brand campaign, a deep-dive into the company’s mission. The campaign was scheduled to launch in the midst of COVID-19, and the team quickly pivoted their approach. “March 12th, we all met, and we said ‘This is not going to be right.’ Because it’s not about us, it’s about them,’ said Naveen Agarwal, Chief Marketing Officer at Prudential. Agarwal and team developed a new campaign that focused on hope and the heroes on the frontlines, in just eight short days – from concept to production to launch. Agarwal shared, “I actually think that what [the pandemic] has done is allow large companies to think agile. Not agile as a methodology which is in my mind a small aim; the big aim to me, is when the company starts thinking fast and acting fast.”

2. Diverse Knowledge Base

There’s often a push in one’s career to specialize in a particular area. But running a financial services firm’s digital efforts, as CIO, CTO, or CMO, calls for a combination of business and technical skill sets. Brooke Forbes, CIO at Fidelity Investments, agrees, “Digital leadership really embodies the connection between business acumen, technology acumen, and even operational acumen.” And Forbes has a career that spans all three.

After starting out in business roles working for technology, software, and consulting services companies, she moved into a COO role managing the operational reporting and sales and marketing forecasting for a particular technology platform.

She jokes, “I fell over the other side of the fence one day [into a technical role] because my boss said to me, ‘You know what? I’m going to ask you to run this thing.’ And from that moment forward, I found myself in the business of leading development organizations through large scale platform transformations. What I found I loved about it was that I could bring the end user and the business perspective to the conversation. Because it’s not technology for the sake of technology, it’s technology in the name of what client, business or associate experience or outcome we’re all trying to drive. And having that intersection of the conversation I find is where the magic and the innovation really happens.”

3. An Insatiable (and Humble) Hunger to Learn

A smart leader knows that though they may have a lot of experience, there is always more to learn. Dontá Wilson, Chief Digital Client Experience and Marketing Officer at Truist (formerly BB&T and SunTrust), went from regional bank president to oversight across all things digital including product research, UX, client experience, analytics, marketing, innovation, and communications. With his primary area of expertise in client relations, he relies on humility and a team of experts to drive strategic digital innovation.

“I have a fantastic team of some of the best and brightest talent in the world. One of the things that I committed to very early on was to […] know what I don’t know; to be very open and transparent about [my team] being the smartest people in the room and that I’m going to lean on them to make the critical decisions. But I’m also going to lean on them to teach me and educate me to fill gaps, because I felt it was strategically important.”

Wilson walks the walk on this commitment with a once a month 2-hour deep-dive tutorial session, along with a full ‘Saddle Day,’ where he sits with someone on his team and actually does their job with them looking over his shoulder.

4. Client Centric Viewpoint

No matter how much a leader (or leaders) knows or how much experience they have, today’s successful leader must use the client as their compass for every decision made within their organization. Digital leaders need to be thinking about their customer, be it external or internal, at all times.

Wilson’s role is a perfect example of that. It has responsibility “for making sure that we show enough care for our clients and that we wake up every day with our client at the center of every business decision that we make,” said Wilson.

Wilson shared that the reason it’s so important to put clients at the center is because, “client experience is now the differentiator because people have options. There’s product and price parity, so you have this competitive, what I call sea of sameness. So you can get price here, you can get product here that’s similar to your competition. You build a store here, they can build a store there. Most financial services companies move to what I would call a lake of differentiation. So, smaller than that sea of sameness, and they did it based on the human experience.”

5. Understand the Critical Importance of Human Connection

Though Forbes pointed out that she’s “in the business of technology,” she also emphasized the importance of enabling Fidelity advisors to create a human connection with their clients by putting the client at the center of every engagement. Forbes pointed out that in this “economy of customer choice,” it’s imperative to let customers guide their own journey. For her, that means providing an omnichannel experience and creating an ecosystem for clients.

“If you really have the mindset that it’s an ecosystem, the ability to leverage a channel at any given point in time thoughtfully, with personalization in mind for that client experience, it gives organizations and those serving their clients, be it advisors or other kinds of roles, a lot of flexibility and scale. [It also allows you] to deliver the human touch in a really omnichannel way, and platforms like Hearsay really give you a lot of power in that,” she shared.

Conclusion

Agility, a love of learning, customer centricity, a broad range of knowledge, and the belief in the power of human connection have made certain leaders stand out while driving digital transformation. And as the pandemic crisis drove waves of change through many aspects of business, it forced the acceleration of digital transformation. This disruption tested and challenged the agility and adaptability of leaders across the globe. Are there other traits you think will be important for leaders going forward? We’d love to hear from you! Use #FSDigitalLeaders and @HearsaySystems on Twitter.

Hearsay Summit 2020: Delivering a Human Client Experience in Extraordinary Times

A big thanks to each of the 500 marketing, distribution, and compliance leaders who joined us at the annual Hearsay Summit – for the first time ever, virtually! We were thrilled to have a highly engaged audience and incredibly insightful presentations from our customer and partner speakers.

A few of our key takeaways were published by ThinkAdvisor, if you missed the event or want to share it with colleagues. I’ve also highlighted a couple of my favorite moments below, in both written and sketch format.

Digital is a Permanent Priority

Kathryn Lattuca, leader of Emerging Experiences & Analytics at the Royal Bank of Canada, participated in our keynote presentation, and she shared that although they’ve been putting in very long hours over the past month, they are seeing some silver linings. The acceleration that occurred due to COVID-19 set the stage for a more seamless digital workflow. She believes the following positive changes are here to stay:

  • A stronger partnership between compliance and marketing to more quickly triage new content and better manage how and what is distributed
  • A focus on providing customers a seamless experience into digital entry points
  • Empowered advisors leveraging digital channels to build deeper relationships with clients, at the right time, on the right channel

This sentiment that while COVID is temporary, the changes to behavior and digital acceleration we’re experiencing as a result are not, was a theme throughout the event.

“Approachable Authorities” – The Importance of the Last Mile

Naveen Agarwal, Chief Marketing Officer at Prudential Financial, coined a wonderful term for advisors and agents, approachable authorities. Prudential’s purpose is “making lives better by solving the financial challenges of our changing world.” Naveen shared that Prudential’s advisors and the last mile communications with their clients are critical to fulfilling Prudential’s purpose, since their role is to really listen to clients. He explained, “We believe that, especially when it comes to complex decisions, when it comes to things where people have to be reassured, we think about what it means for you. Without that last mile it would be impossible to help the customer in the deep way that we want to. It’s critical for us that we get the last mile really nailed.”

To learn more, the full resources from the event are available on our Summit website.