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Not Your Grandma’s Website: Welcome to Your New Digital Hub

For years, the humble website faded into the background, quietly working while emails zipped out, social media dazzled the business world, and live events grabbed attention with flashy keynote speakers and deal-closing conversations. 

In 2020, everything changed. From local insurance offices and retail bank branches, to bank headquarters and popular steakhouses, the world stood still. High-profile events and industry conferences were cancelled or converted to virtual-only experiences. Email inboxes and social media feeds were flooded with updates, brand messages, and webinar invitations. 

Many consumers were suddenly stuck at home, hungry for information and limited to the internet. A tidal wave of questions and requests hit the financial industry, sending advisors, agents and bankers scrambling to respond. With no in-person options available and an astonishing volume of inquiries that could not be met with a one-to-one approach, the importance of a broadcast approach, via personal websites and digital interactions skyrocketed. 

COVID-19 underscored the increasing need for a comprehensive digital strategy that includes professional websites at the field level. But even before the pandemic, there were a number of reasons why establishing a robust website program for bankers or advisors was a long-term strategic requirement. Although there exist several website types that provide specific tactical benefits, including listing pages and landing pages, we believe the most important and impactful website is the multi-page site that showcases an advisor’s professional experience, coverage areas and credentials, while capturing leads and providing curated content.

A robust website effectively serves as a digital hub that empowers each advisor or agent to: 

Welcome visitors to an “always open” digital office

Websites provide the opportunity to create a favorable first impression and share in-depth information that establishes credibility and builds trust. They allow an employee’s personality, experience, and approach to client service to come to life in a way that’s available whenever a prospect is ready to learn, whether that’s 3:00 am on a Tuesday or noon on a Sunday. 

Connect the digital dots 

Consumers search for information in a variety of mediums. There is no “linear path” anymore. A prospective client may start on LinkedIn, the next on Google and a third by reaching out for recommendations via an email to work colleagues. Advisors must meet consumers where they are by making information accessible across all digital touchpoints. Adding a URL that leads to her polished website across all her social media profiles (and in her email signature) achieves this.

Provide a localized and curated experience 

Trust in institutions is at an all-time low, while trust in peers and local experts is at an all-time high. This means that someone is more likely to trust the advisor working with his cousin or best friend than a high-profile company that runs ads during his favorite television show. Giving an advisor the ability to connect at a one-to-one level with local prospects by promoting a local event (such as a charity drive or tailgating event), tailoring content to a specific audience (such as boaters in South Florida), and curating articles or blog posts around his or her coverage area (such as advisory expertise for generational wealth transfer or savings plans for first-time homebuyers) creates a sense of connection and personal relevance that a corporate website or program cannot. 

As they say, you never have a second chance to make a first impression. When busy or anxious consumers are searching for a wealth advisor, mortgage banker, or insurance agent, they are seeking someone with the knowledge, experience and resources to help them achieve their goals. A robust website, acting as the digital hub that connects prospective clients across all possible touchpoints, is a savvy way to own that impression and stand out in the current environment. 

Slow that Scroll: How to Capture Eyeballs for Your Social Videos

If you still need to be convinced of video’s marketing efficacy, you’ve come to the wrong place. If you’re already bought into video and just aren’t sure how to start, this should help get you from lights, to camera, to action.

When the only tool you have is a hammer…

Video works, but that doesn’t mean it’s the right tool for every job. Who are you trying to talk to? What do you hope they’ll think, feel, or do after seeing your post? If after thinking it through it feels like you might be using video for the sake of using video, switch gears and save your filming fun for another day.

The right way to use video

There’s no one right way to use video. Like every other trick in the content marketer’s bag, the magic is in knowing your audience and creating an experience that makes sense within the context of the chosen channel.

Imagine, for example, a financial advisor who’s looking for a way to mix some personal posts in with more professional fare as a way to nurture existing client relationships and stay top of mind. She shoots a 10-second velfie (video selfie) of her daughter and herself showing off their freshly dyed Easter eggs, and posts it to LinkedIn, Facebook and Instagram with a text teaser that reads, “Teaching my daughter early to never put all her eggs in one basket. #teachablemoment #assetallocation”. 

By posting a short, relatable video with a wink towards her work, she bridges the different vibes of the three channels she chose with content people are inclined to like, comment on, and share with their friends: “This is that financial advisor I was telling you about. Great person, and really knows her money stuff.

Now imagine another advisor, also looking for a teachable moment, who decides an explainer video would be a great way to help his clients understand asset allocation, while also reminding them of his expertise. He shoots a 7-minute video of himself talking through considerations and theories, then posts it to Facebook with the text lead, “Understanding Asset Allocation.” 

It’s possible he’s such a dynamic speaker that people will be riveted till the final frame. It’s more likely that Facebookers who see his post won’t even slow their scroll for a long video with a title that sounds like homework. Even if their curiosity is piqued enough to take a peek, seven minutes of complex talk with no visual support could lead them to bounce without engaging. Even worse, the experience may put them off, causing them to feel like they’d prefer an advisor who “gets” them better. Yikes!

Which reminds me

Everybody wants to know the optimal duration for video. Here’s the thing: If it’s interesting, relevant, and timely, or if it informs or entertains or even just pleasantly distracts, then people will watch…and keep watching. But if it’s none of those things, they’ll stop, drop, and scroll within seconds.

That said, one of my favorite co-workers from my Franklin Templeton Investments days used to tell his team to “be brief, be bold, and be gone.” He wasn’t talking about social media content, but it’s not bad video advice.

Final cut: Video is a reliable means for brands and people to make connections with clients and prospects in a way that’s more compelling than pictures plus text. Still, the format can’t compensate for storytelling fails, so think about your audience, put yourself in their shoes, then create a content experience worth having.

Bonus: I made a video about how to make a not-horrible video! Watch it here.

Q&A with Gabrielle Levin, Hearsay’s Director of Content Strategy

Say hello to Gabrielle Levin, Hearsay’s Director of Content Strategy. After being a Hearsay customer for almost 10 years (most recently at PIMCO), Gabby is eager to combine her boots-on-the-ground experience with Hearsay’s offerings to elevate your content strategy! 

Recently, we sat down with Gabby to learn more about her expertise, and how she’ll be partnering with you to build and execute on your content strategy programs. Here’s what she shared.

How did you get into this line of work, and why are you passionate about it?

It was a total accident. After a decade producing TV commercials in New York, I took a break to chase my writer dream, but the irresistible allure of corporate America with its 401k matching and health benefits drew me back in. That’s how I wound up at Franklin Templeton where Matt Dunn – now the EVP of Digital Marketing at PIMCO – and I created a global social media program. That was back when FINRA didn’t even yet have formal guidance for social media! Real frontier stuff.

Confession: I’m not passionate about social media. I am, however, passionate about spending time on stuff that matters, so helping people cut through the clutter and figure out how to make their social selling program yield real results makes me super happy. 

At this point, everyone knows that social is table stakes for good marketing strategy, but so many programs are too tangled in process, politics, or policy to get out of check-the-box mode and into real ROI mode. My mission, which I’ve chosen to accept, is to fix that.

In this past year, how have you seen storytelling and content strategy change? What content themes and channels will continue to thrive in our post-pandemic world?

The most striking shift I’ve seen is in people’s willingness to be more human and personal with their professional social channels. Lockdown left so many of us starved for human connection, which may be what finally nudged people to reveal their more casual side. People like to do business with people they like. A steady stream of stuffy stuff just isn’t going to create that kind of genuine, trust-building connection.

So what thrives now is responsiveness, timeliness, and relevance. That means being more thoughtfully engaged in how you’re showing up in social feeds. No matter the channel, meeting people’s need for information, entertainment, education, acknowledgement, whatever…that’s where the magic will happen. Quality over quantity. 

What is the most common mistake that financial services firms make when it comes to social media content strategy and execution?

The most common misstep I’ve seen more times than I can count isn’t exclusive to financial services firms. It’s the inexplicable choice to create a social program and then starve it of oxygen.

Social media content is a very public face of a firm and its employees, yet somehow people with inadequate experience and/or insufficient support are often at the helm. Maybe it’s an assumption that youth equates to social media expertise, or that pervasive personal use means anybody can “do Facebook,” but channel fluency doesn’t equate to marketing savvy, and personal use is vastly different from business use. Whatever the reason, the result is diluted potency of a program’s potential business impact and potential exposure to unnecessary risk. 

Now that people’s lives have transitioned even more to the digital realm, the importance of supporting a social program with a team of seasoned specialists capable of navigating an emotionally charged landmine field is even more critical.

What is a best practice that any social media content administrator/creator can adopt, regardless of technology or team size?

No matter what your tools are or what your team looks like, you can create content rooted in good storytelling, aka “know your audience”. With human connection as your North Star, even a basic program can deliver meaningful results.

What’s ahead for you at Hearsay? How will you be partnering with our customers?

I’m very much motivated by my experience as a long-time Hearsay customer and the experiences of the other Hearsay customers I’ve met at the annual summit. The common challenges that span our industry—adoption, activity, engagement, demonstrating value, compliance—guide my focus on helping program owners use content to create a virtuous cycle that elevates the entire ecosystem.

My hope is that Hearsay customers think of me as a content strategy consultant and collaborator, available to help with anything from ironing out a specific wrinkle in a one-time working session to engaging in an ongoing series of sessions to create and iterate on an overarching strategy. Bottom line: If you’re a Hearsay customer and you think your content could be generating more engagement or inspiring more enthusiastic adoption or kicking off more business connections, we should talk!

Webinar Recap: Highlights from Putnam Investments’ Annual Social Advisor Survey

In a recent webinar, Mark McKenna, Putnam Investments’ Head of Global Marketing, joined Hearsay’s VP of Marketing, Leslie Leach, to highlight key findings from Putnam Investments’ 8th Annual Social Advisor Study, along with year-end data from Hearsay’s platform. Not surprisingly, this year’s results were a little different, as agents and advisors alike pivoted their strategies to adapt to a socially distanced world.

Here are four key findings from the program: 

Social media not only sustains, but drives new client relationships
With a huge shift away from in-person communications and events, digital noise on traditional channels increased significantly, with an accompanying decrease in engagement. Although advisors may have already been connected with clients on social media pre-pandemic, the crisis drove an increase in sheer volume of interactions. Not only were advisors expected to communicate with current clients, they also leveraged their online presence to garner new business, exploiting features like LinkedIn’s view of 2nd and 3rd degree connections, InMail and Sales Navigator to effectively prospect to an expanded network. The study also found that lesser-used networks like Instagram had higher engagement rates, highlighting an area of opportunity for advisors.

Retaining authenticity remains critical for breakthrough
Being able to stand out among the noise is now a crucial day-to-day consideration for advisors. Not only do they need to provide thought leadership via social media, they also need to be more personal, striking a balance between providing corporate content and connecting on a more authentic level with clients. Advisors who shared more personalized content were rewarded with higher engagement rates across their social media accounts. 

Pro tip: Leslie recommended leveraging Hearsay’s modified content templates as a scalable solution. “By their nature, modified content templates are easier and faster to review from a supervision perspective, combining corporate scale with the ability to easily personalize content at an individual level.”

Direct messaging satisfies the need for speedier response time
Because advisors could no longer hold in-person meetings, the use of digital tools like social DMs, text messages, mobile calls, and emails, grew significantly, along with a more pervasive client expectation for quicker response times. 

An advisor’s response time can make or break a client relationship, and advisors rose to the challenge. Texting conversations on Relate, Hearsay’s compliant texting solution were up 3x compared with 2019, while the average response rate was 13 minutes, versus the industry standard of 14 hours for an email. With more widespread acceptance, and the ability to enforce compliance, in-app messaging is proving to be an indispensable tool for field teams. 

Support from the home office matters
With a shift to remote work, advisors still require the same amount of support—if not more—from their home offices. Advisors all learn differently, so remembering that different training modalities work for different people, and providing various learning tracks, templates and models, helps to speed adoption. It’s important for advisors to connect where their clients want to connect, and with proper support for the home office, advisors can be more efficient in their client engagements.

A huge thanks to both Mark and Leslie for sharing the key findings and observations from Putnam’s Social Advisor Study and Hearsay’s 2020 platform usage and results! Sign up to access the on-demand webinar here.

Retain and Grow Relationships

This is the final post in the “Last Mile of Digital Maturity” series. Read part 1 here, part 2 on reaching and attracting the right prospect here, part 3 on scale and orchestration to target the right prospect here, and part 4 on nurturing and converting new business here.

While new client acquisition is important, meeting overall business targets demands that firms maintain and build on existing relationships. The best leading indicator for continued business growth and retention is a steady volume of 1-to-1 conversations with clients. More consistent, personal communications translate to deeper relationships which build trust. 

Establish a Cadence

We all know that relationships are built over time, whether personal or professional. It’s critical that your field regularly engages with clients—reaching out on a birthday or graduation, proactively scheduling annual reviews or recommending coverage changes—while also staying top of mind during less predictable moments of market volatility or turmoil.

To develop these communication rhythms, firms need to embrace digital channels that encourage usage, promote the right behaviors, and measure adoption, as digital programs are of little value if they’re not being utilized. 

Surface the Right Behaviors

Core systems like CRM are important to the enterprise, but self-recording activities are time- consuming and take away from a rep’s core business. Often, data doesn’t get entered unless automated, and many firms have no idea how frequently and effectively their reps are engaging with prospects and customers. 

Without this data, corporate marketing messages can be off-target or tone deaf. To truly understand the last-mile engagements that deliver an authentic experience, firms must arm themselves with the data that enable them to deploy a more advanced, personalized content strategy aimed at cross-sell and up-sell. Likewise, sales and distribution leaders can better assess the success rate of various techniques. 

Mature firms are addressing this process head on by automating this process, ensuring interaction data feeds business intelligence, CRM and core systems to guide actions. Data holds the key to these insights—but firms must invest in an infrastructure that automatically captures this activity. Only then can you identify the opportunities that truly optimize your approach. (Learn more about how strategic integrations allow firms to enrich CRMs and turn every rep into their best rep in our white paper.)

Deliver a Best-in-Class Client Experience

In financial services, the most telling indicator of client retention is last-mile engagements. Most programs should aim to facilitate a minimum of 10 personal touch points per client, per year. The most mature firms leverage a digital platform and data to guide the field to deliver a consistent experience to every client, maximizing the value of these touch points to drive optimal behaviors. By guiding and lightly prompting field outreach during key moments, they’re increasing the likelihood of more consistent outcomes that translate to deeper, more entrenched client relationships. 

Interested in helping your field build deeper relationships and grow their business? Download our white paper now

Are You Ready? FCA Restatement Puts UK Social Media Programmes on Alert

The FCA recently published guidance reiterating a long-standing mandate of the regulator: the onus is on FCA-regulated organisations to monitor employee behaviour for bad actors. Therefore, even if conduct isn’t tied to a specific rule, poor behaviour that results in someone getting harmed will see the FCA take action.

For firms doing business in the United Kingdom, it’s time to ask whether you are sufficiently prepared for the restatement of this mandate. Essentially, the FCA is putting those firms on notice that certain activities that pertain to conduct—including communications across social networks—will now be under greater scrutiny. 

In conjunction with the Senior Managers and Certification Regime (“SMCR”), which makes senior management accountable, the FCA’s restatement puts further responsibility on leadership to ensure their employees are acting in a way that is consistent with their policies.  

To proactively manage this risk, forward-looking programmes should review their compliance and supervision policies and procedures to ensure that they account for the FCA’s guidance, and that the four pillars of a robust compliance programme are fit-for-purpose.

Anyone involved in a client engagement programme (marketing, compliance, sales) can utilise the questions below to assess the readiness of their existing programme.

  • Policies
    • Have you outlined acceptable behaviour as it relates to electronic communications?
    • Have you defined which channels (SMS, social media, instant messaging) are permitted, and by whom?
    • Do you have a procedure in place to periodically review and update your policies as needed?
    • Is your senior leadership involved in the sign-off of those policies?
  • Content
    • Do you have controls in place to ensure you’re distributing only fair and balanced (not misleading) content?
    • Do you have a way to monitor for recommendations that may not be appropriate for either content or audience?
    • Have you held training sessions with your employees on policies, including recording attendance?
  • Supervision
    • Have you assessed your pre-approval and post-approval breakdown of financial promotions to ensure appropriateness for your business model?
    • Do you have lexicons in place that block or flag problematic content?
    • Are there people in the approval workflow with the requisite training and/or experience?
    • Does your Senior Management have sufficient insight into your electronic communication regime, including social media or text messaging, to satisfy their Duty of Responsibility under SMCR?
  • Archiving
    • Are you capturing all of your social media posts, profiles, and audit trails for each step during the approval workflow?
    • Are they being stored in a way that is consistent with the applicable regulations (e.g. durable media for MiFID-related communications)?
    • Do you have a way to reliably and quickly retrieve these records in the event that you need them?

While these are not the only questions that a Senior Manager should ask, they can lay the groundwork for an internal dialogue that reassesses your response preparedness. All firms should strive to understand the implications of this restatement, and enforce effective policies and procedures as part of their ongoing oversight. 

Reaching & Attracting the Right Prospect

The First Step in Developing Last-Mile Digital Maturity

As we shared in our first blog post of this series, a new phase of digital maturity is underway. Transformational financial services firms are proactively orchestrating how the field engages with clients in the “last-mile” and guiding seamless handoffs between channels to deliver business outcomes.

Guiding your field to deliver outcomes at scale is difficult. It takes time to set up the right framework, mine the data, and leverage technology to scale efforts across a distributed network of advisors and agents. COVID placed immediate pressure on firms to rethink service offerings and accelerate digital adoption; these changes will be entrenched amongst the most digitally mature.
But transformation doesn’t happen overnight: The first step in the digital maturity journey is building the consistency and scale needed to cultivate brand awareness and acquire leads.

The Building Blocks of Reach & Attract

In this age, a credible digital presence and robust social media profiles are table stakes for advisor and agent validation. Recent research shows it takes less than two-tenths of a second for an online visitor to form a first opinion of your brand once they’ve seen your profile or website. Not surprisingly, consumers frequently visit a number of sites to conduct research on financial services decisions. Prospects in an investigative phase will gravitate toward advisors with a strong digital presence. Think of it this way—would you go to a restaurant that wasn’t reviewed online?

How can firms help their teams meet this demand? It starts by building a strong social presence across the corporate brand and the field. Tapping into the network effect of social media, firms can reach a wider range of clients and prospects across demographics and regions. But credibility is key: In our analysis, advisors and agents with professional-quality profiles are 7x more likely to be called for a referral.

A cohesive strategy around social and web programs helps drive leads and increase conversion rates – that’s why it’s critical to empower your field with personalized, content-rich and SEO-optimized websites. Leads in financial services are predominantly sourced at the individual level, so a firm’s ability to deliver their field personalized websites at scale, while remaining aligned with corporate messaging, can promote a seamless client journey that captures leads while maintaining a consistent and rich brand experience.

Establishing Digital Credibility

In working with enterprise clients over the past decade, we’ve found a few consistently clear indicators for social media presence success:

  • Personalized, content-rich and SEO optimized websites for >90% of field teams.
  • At least 75% of the field has a complete social media presence. This includes: a professional photo, branding, and information detailing areas of expertise.
  • At least two major social networks are activated. While firms may gravitate toward a particular network, embracing the flexibility to connect with customers on their preferred network—which may be Instagram—is important.

These measurable steps to establishing digital credibility are the building blocks for achieving the consistency and scale needed to build your brand and acquire leads.

Attribution and Measurement

You’ve no doubt heard that what gets measured is managed. Yet one metric that is often underutilized is click-level attribution, which allows firms to evaluate the effectiveness of content, segmentation, and users, as well as assess ROI.

With Hearsay’s URL Attribution tool, firms can tag social media content with unique UTM codes to monitor inbound website traffic from social media down to the hierarchy, user, and content level. This can then be compared to organic, paid and referral traffic, and assigned a tangible ad equivalency value.

For one Hearsay customer, this level of data granularity underscored a significant increase in social traffic, and click-level attribution is now consistently a top driver of overall web traffic. This has had a tangible business impact—alongside their single customer view (a consolidated database which ingests information from their CRM, email and website analytics), social analytics help drive a deeper analytical understanding of their investor base. For instance, they now know prospects arriving on their website from social are more likely to invest than those arriving from other channels.

Supervision to Mitigate Risk

Finally, to mitigate risk and, where necessary, properly supervise client engagement activity, channels need to connect with a platform that allows for scalable monitoring, supervision, and potential remediation of client engagement activity. An essential building block for any digital engagement program is a framework for risk mitigation. When client engagement channels are connected to a unified supervision platform, your teams have a single platform to review multiple channels, streamlining efforts so they can focus more effectively on risk control.

With these foundational pieces in place, mature firms are integrating core technologies to build economies of scale and reach even more clients and prospects.

Next time, we’ll take a look at achieving scale and consistency in the reach and attract phase of lead generation and client engagement. And just like last week, if you can’t wait to learn more, download the full white paper now.

Stop the insanity! What financial services firms can learn from the GameStop frenzy

Accessing—and acting upon—financial advice seen on social media platforms is nothing new. But not until the recent trading frenzy around GameStop has this new reality come under sharp scrutiny. After retail investors on a Reddit discussion board drove an astronomical increase in stock value, GameStop stock is now sharply falling. The resulting volatility has led to a market valuation swing of over $30 billion for the company in just this year.

The potential for outsized risk and high-stakes consequences resulting from crowdsourced actions born on social media platforms has never been more apparent. And while the reputation risk for firms that must oversee advisors’ social media behavior has always been a concern, the legal risk is real as well.

To protect themselves and their advisors on social media, financial services firms can implement three key steps:

  1. Communicate a clear social media strategy for personnel. This should include how and what channels they can use, the content they can publish—including which original content or corporate-provided content they may modify—and what supervision process they need to undergo. Additionally, the policy should address firm expectations pertaining to the use of social media during non-business hours, any prohibited use-cases, and include the repercussions of not abiding by the policy.
  1. Employ automated supervision workflows to review advisor-created content prior to posting. This can be made more efficient by using a tool like Hearsay, which surfaces and remediates sensitive communications via an AI-powered alert system, so that supervisors can focus on high-risk violations. 
  1. Test adherence to the policy. In addition to having advisors attest to their understanding and adherence to the social media policy, firms should implement a program to test that social media usage aligns with the policy.

One takeaway from the past few weeks is that there continues to be a huge desire for financial advisors and their clients to connect and communicate using social media. At Hearsay, we saw a 24% increase in advisors actively using social media across our platform in 2020 vs. 2019. And a 2020 advisor survey by Putnam Investments found that 9 in 10 advisors say that not only has social media changed the nature of client relationships during the pandemic, but that this change is here to stay. Given the potential impact to an organization’s reputation and the viral nature of this medium, firms need to establish and secure proper guardrails in order to support and enhance the connections enabled by social media, while minimizing the risks.

Welcome to the “Last-Mile” Digital Maturity Series

A new phase of digital maturity is underway. Transformational firms are optimizing across the client journey, proactively orchestrating the way in which the field engages with their clients in the “last-mile” and guiding seamless handoffs between channels to deliver business outcomes.

To help you get there, Hearsay has developed a framework for how you can evaluate your path to digital maturity. Along the way, we’ll provide insights and identify opportunities to accelerate your progress along the maturity curve. 

Over the next few months, we’ll share weekly blog posts with the framework components. This framework allows you not just to identify where your program sits, but to illuminate key areas for program growth that deliver the outcomes your business demands. 

But first, let’s start with why it matters.

The most digitally mature firms are enabling frequent and targeted engagement between advisors and clients. These interactions deepen the relationship between the advisor and client, and are what we call the “last-mile.” In a crowded, commoditized marketplace, this is the most differentiated experience you can offer so advice must be delivered in a human way to resonate.

As the ways to digitally engage clients have proliferated, leading firms have begun to recognize the need for an integrated and cohesive technology ecosystem. Their digital programs have become more systematic, and their digital platforms more integrated across their core technologies. 

Our aim is to align your program with your business objectives – centered around three key outcomes – shifting your focus toward the digital actions that drive the most success.

  1. Reach & Attract – Achieve the consistency and scale needed to build brand and acquire new leads
  2. Nurture & Convert – Optimize engagement to influence new business generation.
  3. Retain & Grow – Leverage digital to drive better client support and boost loyalty and retention.

Guiding your field to deliver these outcomes at scale is difficult. It takes time to set up the right framework, mine your data, and leverage technology to scale your efforts across a distributed network of advisors and agents. 

A new breed of marketing organizations, alongside a new generation of advisors and agents, are leveraging digital channels to find new ways to reach and attract clients and prospects. COVID-19 accelerated this transformation. Digital activities are more critical than ever when the field cannot participate in physical top of funnel activities like local sponsorships etc. COVID has put immediate pressure on the industry to rethink service offerings, and explore digital as a way to keep their business moving forward. Looking to the future, these behaviors will be entrenched amongst the most digitally mature. We’ll get started next week by discussing the foundational elements you need to Reach & Attract prospects. 

If you can’t wait to learn more, download the full white paper now.